Woven scarf

Having mastered the granny square (yes, I’m still a bit chuffed about that) I’ve been digging out all the partial balls of yarn I have left from other projects and the ones I bought with nothing in particular in mind. I do that a lot, I’m a sucker for a pretty colour. In the middle of the basket of yarn, I dug up some funky red wool I’d bought on whim. I’m also a sucker for things that are red. It’s multi thickness, very thin in some places and quite fat in other places. I tried to crochet with it, but frankly everything I did looked a bit shit. The very thin bits end up looking too loose and stringy if I used a hook for the fat bits, and if I used a middling hook, the fat bits didn’t play.

I thought it might look a bit cool if I used it to weave a scarf, but not having a loom was a bit of an issue. I do have a small square loom (one of those ones with the nails around the edge of a frame) which I could have used, but I don’t know where it is to be honest, so that was out. There’s lots of options for making looms out of other things. I pondered coat hangers, sticks and even shutting the ends in a drawer when I stumbled upon the idea of using an embroidery frame.

Embroidery frame loom

At first I considered hammering a row of nails in each roller, but it wouldn’t have worked as I was using the rollers to hold the completed work as well as the waiting to be rolled up yarn (you know what I mean). So instead I drilled a series of holes in each roller, 1cm apart. Then I cut the yarn into sections a bit longer than I wanted the scarf to be and threaded them one at a time through the holes, tying a knot to keep them in place.

Did it work? It mostly did work okay! Rolling the rollers to keep the threads tight worked as I planned, with the only issues being some slightly longer yarn which went a bit loose at the end. The hardest bit was the first rolling, which you can see above. Keeping the warp threads in order was a bit tricky, but it works fine if you take it nice and slowly.

Weaving in progress

It is, as you can see, wonky. I think this is due in part to the different thicknesses of the yarn, it was not always possible to keep it all tight and straight, but as it apparent in many of my projects, a little bit of wonky doesn’t trouble me. The chopstick is there to push the weft thread more tightly into place. Basically it’s weave a line, push into place, weave the next line, push into place… The whole thing is done in the basic Under One, Over One weave except for the places when I messed up.

Once I’d reached the end, I cut the warp threads and tied them off in pairs (having planned ahead, I had an even number of holes drilled) and then added some more yarn as a fringy bit on the end because making a fringe is the easy way out.

Finished woven scarf

It’s actually a little short, but it keeps my neck warm and that is what counts. Wonky as it is, I’m a little bit charmed by it and will wear it without too much embarrassment.

I’m planning to try out the “loom” on some other things, as soon as I fix the two holes that were too close together and ended up as one big hole – this is fine for chunky yarn but hopeless for thinner stuff. Of course thinner stuff might not work anyway as the holes are so far apart. However I have other frames I can drill holes in if I want to. Pleasingly, they are still completely usable as embroidery frames too as the fabric strips are not disturbed by the drilling.

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